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Curly Coated Retriever

   

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We at SoftMaple have been active in showing and breeding pure bred dogs since 1979. Active in Curly Coated Retrievers since 1993. In that time we have belonged to a number of All Breed Kennel Clubs, Performance Clubs and Specialty Breed Clubs. I have held various offices in clubs and been on countless committees. I have stewarded for many breeds and all levels of obedience. I have been an assistant instructor for obedience classes as well as giving many obedience and agility demonstrations.

 

You do not have to be a member of a National breed club to have a love of the breed. On the other hand, you do not have to be a breeder or serious show person to benefit from an All Breed Club or a National Breed Club.



I personally have shown several dogs to the CD level, a couple to the CDX level, and one to the UD level. I have won an all breed High in Trial. Multiple Match HITs. Match Group wins. I have shown many dogs to their CGC title before I became a CGC evaluator for the AKC. Now I don't do as many of my own dogs to the CGC, since I tend to always be doing the tests for others! I have shown 7 dogs to their Championships. (and helped put points on many others) Put a CKC Ch on one of my dogs, as well as a CKC CD and CDX. I put the first AKC agility title on a CCR. The First NA, the first OA, and the first AX. As well as the first curly to earn a USDAA agility title. I have put TDI's on a couple of my dogs, as well as ST (Stability Test title) I don't show as much as I did, due to job and time constraints. And usually when I go to a national specialty, I don't take any of my own dogs, since as a fancier of the breed, I like to be free to observe what other breeders have been producing over the last year. Bringing a string of dogs to show... you just don't have the time to do that all important research.

curly-coated-retriever

 

Curly Coated Retriever Club of America winner

Soft Maple Club Affiliations: (past and present)

Curly Coated Retriever Club of America:
(1999 National Specialty Co-chairman)
(Former Head of Web Page Committee)
( National Specialty Committee)


Curly Coated Retriever Club of Canada:
(Head of Web Page Committee)

North East Curly Consortium:
(Charter Member)
(Head of Web Page Committee)


Curly Coated Retriever Club of Great Britain

North Country Kennel Club:
(Offices held in NCKC:)
Recording Secretary
Vice President
Obedience Chairperson
Chief Ring Steward
Public education


Canine Companions Dog Agility Association

Central NY Retriever Club

Past member in good standing Mid Atlantic Curly Club
Past member in good standing Irish Setter Club of America
Past member in good standing Irish Setter Club of Central NY
Past member in good standing Irish Setter Club of Western NY
Owner Handler Association
4-H Dog Obedience



CCRCA National Specialty winner

 

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My dogs are registered with The American Kennel Club. I have some individual dogs registered with the Canadian Kennel Club and the United Kennel Club.

Be aware that AKC/CKC/UKC registration does not mean quality. It only means that your dog is a pure-bred. Remember, Pet Quality puppies should be considered as just that! Even litters from very well bred parents usually contain only a few show or breeding quality puppies. The rest of the litter, sold as pets can well supply the pet-buying public without any lessening of the breed standards, providing that the buyers realize that, while pure-bred, these individuals are not breeding stock. You might not be able to tell the difference between a show or breeding quality and a pet quality dog, but there are differences. Your pet will still be a delightful companion, but it might have some minor fault not desirable in a breeding animal. Spayed and neutered dogs make better family companions and their chances for some cancers are lessened. In fact most reputable breeders will insist that pets be sold on a spay/neuter contract or on a limited registration.


There are nearly 5000 dog clubs in the United States that hold affiliated events under the umbrella of the AKC for competition by AKC registered dogs. Some are national parent clubs, (CCRCA) others local specialty clubs,(NECC) and still others are devoted to a broad variety of performance events from agility to obedience, tracking, field tests and trials You should consider joining one of these groups of dog lovers who share the common interest of raising, training, breeding and competing with purebred dogs.

These clubs not only further the sport of purebred dogs, but also many strive to promote and protect dogs in their communities, share in educational programs, sponsor training classes and health clinics, and operate a rescue network, as well as responsible breeder locator service. The CCRCA has a strong rescue network. An all breed club is a great place to start learning about the world of purebred dogs. Within an all breed club, you may find information on Training classes, fun matches, CGC tests, health clinics and educational seminars.


Curlycoat retrievers

Help! My bitch just came into season, who do I breed her to!

Fortunately this question does not come up frequently in curlies. (Or I hope not!) Most breeders have thought long and hard about whom they want to use as a stud over their bitch. Some breeders have thought breedings out generations ahead of time, while the prospective brood bitches are still young pups in the whelping boxes themselves!

With the improvements in storing frozen semen, collecting and shipping fresh chilled semen, your breeding choices donī¿½t have to be confined to a geographic area. With quarantines newly lifted, the options for stud dogs may broaden considerably.

I have tried not to let my geographic location have any bearing on whom I choose for a stud dog. I have shipped bitches for breeding in the US and Canada. I have had fresh chilled semen sent from across the US for a breeding. I have sent one bitch over seas for a breeding to a foreign stud. And my latest litter was a result of fresh chilled semen sent from overseas.

With the use of fresh chilled and frozen semen, you do have the potential for higher breeding costs, and the potential for decreased litter size in some cases. Finding and using the right stud for your bitch isnī¿½t about producing a huge litter. Its about producing a few quality dogs that fulfil the goals you have for the breeding and the resulting offspring.

When using an overseas stud, you must often rely on pictures, video and the word of mouth of people who have met the dogs in person. But this is the case with many US breedings where you may not have had the opportunity to meet the dog in person, or you met the dog when he was just a puppy, and you do not know how he matured. I was very fortunate to deal with breeders and owners who were very helpful in supplying whatever I wanted to do my research on these potential studs. This included pictures of the dog, his parents, siblings, and any offspring he may have had on the ground. Videotapes of the dog and relatives. Talking with other breeders overseas who have used the particular dog, or close relatives of his. Surprisingly, I did not run into the language barrier that I thought would have been the biggest hindrance to the breeding.

The registration process for both litters was straightforward. Obtain DNA on the stud and the bitch. Supply an official copy of his pedigree from his country of birth. Fill out an AKC Special litter registration application that can be downloaded from the AKC site. For the case of the fresh chilled overseas breeding, I sent along the collection form filled out by the Veterinarian who collected the semen, which was also signed, by the Veterinarian who inseminated on this end.

Dogs are living creatures. In life there is no guarantee. Any breeding has its pros, its cons, and its risks. The dog in your own backyard may be the best choice for your bitch. But if he is not, its nice to know we have more options open every year for choosing a stud.

Article written by Cathy Lewandowski for the Curly Coated Retriever Club of America's publication The Curly Commentator

CCRCA National Specialty best of winners

Breeding beyond boundaries.
How many times have your gone to the National or a large regional dog show to check out prospective studs and been disappointed in the lack of choices? Sometimes nothing you see complements the bitch you have. With today's shrinking world, there are more options open to breeders. One of those options is using an over seas stud. With the improvements in storing frozen semen, collecting and shipping fresh chilled semen, and newly lifted quarantines; your breeding choices don't have to be confined to your geographic area.

When using an overseas stud, you must often rely on pictures, video and word of mouth of people who have met the dogs in person. But this is the case with many US studs where you may not have had the opportunity to meet the dog in person. Or even the case of having only seen the dog as an adolescent and you do not know how he has matured. I was fortunate to deal with breeders and owners who were very helpful in supplying whatever I wanted to do my research on potential overseas studs. This included pictures of the dog, his parents, siblings, and any offspring he may have had on the ground. Videotapes of the dog and relatives. Talking with other breeders overseas who have used the particular dog, or close relatives of his in their breeding programs.

I have had experience sending a bitch overseas for a natural breeding. This can't always be done if the country still has quarantine laws in effect. My latest litter was a result of fresh chilled semen sent from overseas. You can still run into problems with customs and language barriers resulting in delays. Timing is everything when using fresh chilled semen. Even a day's delay can mean the difference between having a litter and not. It did take a bit more planning to make sure it all came off smoothly. With fresh chilled, you should decide before hand on what kind of extender you will use, and what type of shipping container it will be transported in. A test collection and storage of the stud is a great idea. That way you know how many days his semen will live. Not all dogs are alike, and not all dogs semen react to the extender and chilling the same.

Everything you need to register such a litter is clearly explained on the AKC website. I am currently bringing in frozen semen from overseas to store in the US. This has its pros and cons. With Frozen semen you donī¿½t have to worry about the timing of shipping, as you can have it on hand months or years in advance of the breeding. One of the drawbacks of frozen semen is with the shorter life span, either surgical or transcervical insemination is recommended over vaginal insemination.

With the use of fresh chilled and frozen semen, you do have the potential for higher breeding costs with the addition of progesterone testing, collection, storage and insemination fees. You also have the potential for decreased litter size in some cases. Finding and using the right stud for your bitch isn't about producing a huge litter. Its about producing a few quality dogs that fulfil the goals you have for the breeding and the resulting offspring.

Article written by Cathy Lewandowski for the Curly Coated Retriever breed column in the AKC Gazette

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